Peace News, Will There Be War Over Cuba?

Peace News, Will There Be War Over Cuba?
Item type
Newspaper
Date
26.10.1962
Description
Front page of Peace News from October 26th 1962 (Peace News has been in production since 1936). On 22nd October 1962 the President of US, John F. Kennedy, told the world that the USSR had set up missile bases on the island of Cuba. Cuba is only 90 miles from teh US coast and in the mistrustful atmosphere of the Cold War Kennedy saw the Soviet bases as a threat. He made it clear that US ships would prevent any more missiles getting to Cuba, even if it meant using force. Tensions increased the next day when it emerged that Soviet ships, carrying more missiles, were heading for Cuba. As the Soviet and US ships neared each other a third World War seemed increasingly likely. Newspapers, such as Peace News, reflected the growing fears around the world. However, both President Kennedy and Soviet Premier Kruschev resisted calls for war and frantically tried to work out a compromise. Six days later, on October 28th, a deal was agreed. The Soviet missiles would be removed in exchange for US promises not to invade Cuba and to secretly remove their missiles from Turkey. That same day the Soviet ships turned back and the Cuban missile sites were dismantled. On the 29th the US began the process of taking its own missiles out of Turkey. The solving of the crisis showed that even when stakes were extremely high, a deal could still be agreed, as long as both sides were willing to compromise.
Image
DSCF9266.jpg

Item type: Newspaper Date: 26.10.1962 Description: Front page of Peace News from October 26th 1962 (Peace News has been in production since 1936). On 22nd October 1962 the President of the US, John F. Kennedy, told the world that the USSR had set up missile bases on the island of Cuba. Cuba is only 90 miles from the US coast and in the mistrustful atmosphere of the Cold War Kennedy saw the Soviet bases as a threat. He made it clear that US ships would prevent any more missiles getting to Cuba, even if it meant using force. Tensions increased the next day when it emerged that Soviet ships, carrying more missiles, were heading for Cuba. As the Soviet and US ships neared each other a third World War seemed increasingly likely. Newspapers, such as Peace News, reflected the growing fears around the world. However, both President Kennedy and Soviet Premier Khrushchev resisted calls for war and frantically tried to work out a compromise. Six days later, on October 28th, a deal was agreed. The Soviet missiles would be removed in exchange for US promises not to invade Cuba and to secretly remove their missiles from Turkey. That same day the Soviet ships turned back and the Cuban missile sites were dismantled. On the 29th the US began the process of taking its own missiles out of Turkey. The solving of the crisis showed that even when stakes were extremely high, a deal could still be agreed, as long as both sides were willing to compromise.

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